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  • 名人的演讲英语

    分类:其他范文 时间:2017-07-26 本文已影响

    篇一:名人英语演讲稿

    名人英语演讲稿

    Tribute to Diana

    致戴安娜——查尔斯·斯宾塞

    Diana was the very essence of compassion, of duty, of style, of beauty. All over the world she was a symbol of selfless humanity. All over the world, a standard bearer for the right of the truly downtrodden, a very British girl who transcend nationality, someone with a natural nobility who was classless.

    在全世界,戴安娜是同情心、责任心、风度和美丽的化身,是无私和人道的象征,是维护真正被践踏的权益的旗手,是一个超越国界的英国女孩,是一个带有自然的高贵气质的人,是一个不分阶层的人。

    This is the text of Earl Spencer's tribute to his sister at her funeral. There is some very deep, powerful and heartfelt sentiment. Would that those at whom it is aimed would take heed. The versions posted on several news services had minor errors. This is precisely as it was deliverd.

    I stand before you today the representative of a family in grief, in a country in mourning before a world in shock.

    We are all united not only in our desire to pay our respects to Diana but rather in our need to do so.

    For such was her extraordinary appeal that the tens of millions of people taking part in this service all over the world via television and radio who never actually met her, feel that they, too, lost someone close to them in the early hours of Sunday morning. It is a more remarkable tribute to Diana than I can ever hope to offer her today.

    Diana was the very essence of compassion, of duty, of style, of beauty. All over the world she was a symbol of selfless humanity, a standard-bearer for the rights of the truly downtrodden, a very British girl who transcended nationality, someone with a natural nobility who was classless, who proved in the last year that she needed no royal title to continue to generate her particular brand of magic.

    Today is our chance to say "thank you" for the way you brightened our lives, even though God granted you but half a life. We will all feel cheated, always, that you were taken from us so young and yet we must learn to be grateful that you came along at all.

    Only now you are gone do we truly appreciate what we are now without and we want you to know that life without you is very, very difficult.

    We have all despaired at our loss over the past week and only the strength of the message you gave us through your years of giving has afforded us the strength to move forward.

    There is a temptation to rush to canonize your memory. There is no need to do so. You stand tall enough as a human being of unique qualities not to need to be seen as a saint. Indeed to sanctify your memory would be to miss out on the very core of your being, your wonderfully mischievous sense of humor with the laugh that bent you double, your joy for life transmitted wherever you took your smile, and the sparkle in those unforgettable eyes, your boundless energy which you could barely contain.

    But your greatest gift was your intuition, and it was a gift you used wisely. This is what underpinned all your wonderful attributes. And if we look to analyze what it was about you that had such a wide appeal, we find it in your instinctive feel for what was really important in all our lives.

    Without your God-given sensitivity, we would be immersed in greater ignorance at the anguish of AIDS and HIV sufferers, the plight of the homeless, the isolation of lepers, the random destruction of land mines. Diana explained to me once that it was her innermost feelings of suffering that made it possible for her to connect with her constituency of the rejected.

    And here we come to another truth about her. For all the status, the glamour, the applause, Diana remained throughout a very insecure person at heart, almost childlike in her desire to do good for others so she could release herself from deep feelings of unworthiness of which her eating disorders were merely a symptom.

    The world sensed this part of her character and cherished her for her vulnerability, whilst admiring her for her honesty. The last time I saw Diana was on July the first, her birthday, in London, when typically she was not taking time to celebrate her special day with friends but was guest of honor at a fund-raising charity evening.

    She sparkled of course, but I would rather cherish the days I spent with her in March when she came to visit me and my children in our home in South Africa. I am proud of the fact that apart from when she was on public display meeting President Mandela, we managed to contrive to stop the ever-present paparazzi from getting a single picture of her.

    That meant a lot to her.

    These were days I will always treasure. It was as if we'd been transported back to our childhood, when we spent such an enormous amount of time together, the two youngest in the family.

    Fundamentally she hadn't changed at all from the big sister who mothered me as a baby, fought with me at school and endured those long train journeys between our parents' homes with me at weekends. It is a tribute to her level-headedness and strength that despite the most bizarre life imaginable after her childhood, she remained intact, true to herself.

    There is no doubt that she was looking for a new direction in her life at this time. She talked

    endlessly of getting away from England, mainly because of the treatment she received at the hands of the newspapers.

    I don't think she ever understood why her genuinely good intentions were sneered at by the media, why there appeared to be a permanent quest on their behalf to bring her down. It is baffling. My own, and only, explanation is that genuine goodness is threatening to those at the opposite end of the moral spectrum.

    It is a point to remember that of all the ironies about Diana, perhaps the greatest was this; that a girl given the name of the ancient goddess of hunting was, in the end, the most hunted person of the modern age.

    She would want us today to pledge ourselves to protecting her beloved boys William and Harry from a similar fate. And I do this here, Diana, on your behalf. We will not allow them to suffer the anguish that used regularly to drive you to tearful despair.

    Beyond that, on behalf of your mother and sisters, I pledge that we, your blood family, will do all we can to continue the imaginative and loving way in which you were steering these two exceptional young men, so that their souls are not simply immersed by duty and tradition but can sing openly as you planned.

    We fully respect the heritage into which they have both been born, and will always respect and encourage them in their royal role. But we, like you, recognize the need for them to experience as many different aspects of life as possible, to arm them spiritually and emotionally for the years ahead. I know you would have expected nothing less from us.

    William and Harry, we all care desperately for you today. We are all chewed up with sadness at the loss of a woman who wasn't even our mother. How great your suffering is we cannot even imagine.

    I would like to end by thanking God for the small mercies he has shown us at this dreadful time; for taking Diana at her most beautiful and radiant and when she had joy in her private life.

    Above all, we give thanks for the life of a woman I am so proud to be able to call my sister: the unique the complex, the extraordinary and irreplaceable Diana, whose beauty, both internal and external, will never be extinguished from our minds.

    篇二:名人演讲中英文对照

    释放你的创造力

    比尔盖茨

    I've been an optimist and I supposed that is rooted in my belief that the power of creativity and intelligence can make the world a better place.

    For as long as I can remember, I've loved learning new things and solving problems. So when I sat down at a computer for the first time in seventh grade, I was hooked. It's was a clunky and teletype machine that barely do anything compared to the computer we have today. But it changed my life.

    When my friend Paul Allen and I stared Microsoft 30 years ago, we had a vision of "a computer on every desk and in every home," which probably sounded a little too optimistic at a time when most computers were the size of refrigerators. But we believe that personal computer would change the world. And they have.

    And after 30 years, I still inspired by computers as I was back in seventh grade.

    我天生乐观,坚信人类凭创造力和聪明才智可以让世界日益美妙,这一设想一直根植于我的内心深处。

    自从记事起,我就热衷于接触新事物、挑战难题。可想而知,我上七年级时第一次坐在计算机前是何等着迷,如入无我之境。那是一台锵锵作响的旧牌机器,和我们今天拥有的计算机相比,它相当逊色几乎一无所用,但正是它改变了我的生活。

    30年前,我和朋友保罗·艾伦创办微软时,我们幻想实现"在每个家庭、在每张办公桌上都有一台计算机",这在大多数的计算机体积如同冰箱的尺寸的年代,听起来有点异想天开。但是我们相信个人电脑将改变世界。今天看来果真如此。30年后,我仍然象上七年级的时候那样为计算机而狂热着迷。

    I believe that computers are the most incredible tool we can use to feed our curiosity and inventiveness-to help us solve problems that even the smartest people couldn't solve on their own. Computer have transformed how we learn, giving kids everywhere a window into all of the world's knowledge. They're helping us build communicates around the things we care about and to stay close to the people who are important to us, no matter where they are.

    Like my friend Warren Buffett, I feel particularly lucky to do something every day I love to do. He calls it "tap-dancing to work". My job at Microsoft is as challenging as ever, but what makes me "tap-dancing to the work" is when we show people something new, like a computer that can recognize your handwriting or your speech, or one that can store a lifetime's worth of photos, and the say: "I didn't know you can do that with a pc!"

    But for all the cool things that a person can do with a pc, there are lots other ways we can put our creativity and intelligence to work to improve our world. There are still far too many people in the world whose most basic needs go unmet. Every year, for example, millions of people die from diseases that are easy to prevent or treat in the developed world.

    我相信计算机是我们用来满足好奇心及发明创造的最神奇的工具--有了它们的帮助,甚至是最聪明的人凭自身力量无法应对的难题都将迎刃而解。计算机已经改变了我们的学习方式,为全球各地的孩子们开启了一扇通向大千世界知识的窗户。它可以帮我们围绕我们关注的事物建立"群",让我们和那些对自己重要的人保持密切联系,不管他们身处何方。

    就像我的朋友沃伦·布非一样,我为每天都能做自己热爱的事情而感到无比幸运。他称之为"踢踏舞工作"。我在微软的工作永远充满挑战,但使我一直坚持"踢踏舞工作"的是我们向人们展示某些新成果的那些时刻,当他们看到计算机能辨认笔迹、语音或者能存储值得

    保留一辈子的照片时就会赞不绝口:"我不敢相信个人电脑竟如此万能"。但是,除了能用电脑做出很酷的事情之外,我们还能通过许多别的方式在工作中发挥自己的创造力和聪明才智,以改善我们的世界。全球仍有许许多多的人连最基本的生存需求都未能解决。举例来说,每年仍有数以万计的人死于那些在发达国家易于预防和治疗的疾病。

    I believe that my own good fortune brings with it a responsibility tp give back to the world. My wife, Melinda, and I have committed to improving health and education in a way that can help as many people as possible.

    As a father, I believe that the death of a child in Africa is no less poignant. or tragic than the death of a child anywhere else. And that doesn't take much to make an immense difference in these children's lives.

    我认为,我所拥有的大量财富也使我负有回馈社会的责任。我的妻子梅林达和我致力于为尽可能多的人改善健康和教育.

    作为一个父亲,我认为,非洲孩子死去所引起的痛苦和悲伤丝毫不亚于任何其他的孩子的死亡;我认为,使这些孩子们的命运发生翻天地覆的变化并不费太大力气。

    I'm still very optimist, and I believe that progress on even the world's toughest problems is possible-and it's happening every day. We're seeing new drugs for deadly diseases, new diagnostic tools, and new attention paid to the health problems in the developing world.

    I'm excited by the possibilities I see for medicine, for education and, of course, for technology. And I believe that through our natural inventiveness , creativity and willingness to solve tough problems, we're going to make some amazing achievements in all these areas in my lifetime.

    我仍是一个坚定的乐观主义者,我坚信即使世界级难题取得进展都是有可能的--其实每天也都在发生着这种事情。我们看到治疗致命疾病的新药、新的诊断器械不断出现,而且,发展中国家的健康问题进入了人们的视野并日益得到重视。

    我为医药、教育,当然还有技术发展的诸多前景而欢欣鼓舞。我相信,凭借人类与生俱来的发明创造能力和不畏艰难、坚忍不拔的品格,在我的有生之年里我们将在所有这些领域都创造出可喜的成就。

    Duty, Honor, Country

    MacArthur

    General Westmoreland, General Grove, distinguished guests, and gentlemen of the Corps! As I was leaving the hotel this morning, a doorman asked me, "Where are you bound for, General?" And when I replied, "West Point," he remarked, "Beautiful place. Have you ever been there before?"

    No human being could fail to be deeply moved by such a tribute as this [Thayer Award]. Coming from a profession I have served so long, and a people I have loved so well, it fills me with an emotion I cannot express. But this award is not intended primarily to honor a personality, but to symbolize a great moral code -- the code of conduct and chivalry of those who guard this beloved land of culture and ancient descent. That is the animation of this medallion. For all eyes and for all time, it is an expression of the ethics of the American soldier. That I should be integrated in this way with so noble an ideal arouses a sense of pride and yet of humility which will be with me always: Duty, Honor, Country.

    Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be. They are your rallying points: to build courage when courage seems to fail; to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith; to create hope when hope becomes forlorn.

    Unhappily, I possess neither that eloquence of diction, that poetry of imagination, nor that brilliance of metaphor to tell you all that they mean. The unbelievers will say they are but words, but a slogan, but a flamboyant phrase. Every pedant, every demagogue, every cynic, every hypocrite, every troublemaker, and I am sorry to say, some others of an entirely different character, will try to downgrade them even to the extent of mockery and ridicule.

    But these are some of the things they do. They build your basic character. They mold you for your future roles as the custodians of the nation's defense. They make you strong enough to know when you are weak, and brave enough to face yourself when you are afraid. They teach you to be proud and unbending in honest failure, but humble and gentle in success; not to substitute words for actions, not to seek the path of comfort, but to face the stress and spur of difficulty and challenge; to learn to stand up in the storm but to have compassion on those who fall; to master yourself before you seek to master others; to have a heart that is clean, a goal that is high; to learn to laugh, yet never forget how to weep; to reach into the future yet never neglect the past; to be serious yet never to take yourself too seriously; to be modest so that you will remember the simplicity of true greatness, the open mind of true wisdom, the meekness of true strength. They give you a temper of the will, a quality of the imagination, a vigor of the emotions, a freshness of the deep springs of life, a temperamental predominance of courage over timidity, of an appetite for adventure over love of ease. They create in your heart the sense of wonder, the unfailing hope of what next, and the joy and inspiration of life. They teach you in this way to be an officer and a gentleman.

    And what sort of soldiers are those you are to lead? Are they reliable? Are they brave? Are they capable of victory? Their story is known to all of you. It is the story of the American man-at-arms. My estimate of him was formed on the battlefield many, many years ago, and has never changed. I regarded him then as I regard him now -- as one of the world's noblest figures, not only as one of the finest military characters, but also as one of the most stainless. His name and fame are the birthright of every American citizen. In his youth and strength, his love and loyalty, he gave all that mortality can give.

    He needs no eulogy from me or from any other man. He has written his own history and written it in red on his enemy's breast. But when I think of his patience under adversity, of his courage under fire, and of his modesty in victory, I am filled with an emotion of admiration I cannot put into words. He belongs to history as furnishing one of the greatest examples of successful patriotism. He belongs to posterity as the instructor of future generations in the principles of liberty and freedom. He belongs to the present, to us, by his virtues and by his achievements. In 20 campaigns, on a hundred battlefields, around a thousand campfires, I have witnessed that enduring fortitude, that patriotic self-abnegation, and that invincible determination which have carved his statue in the hearts of his people. From one end of the world to the other he

    has drained deep the chalice of courage.

    As I listened to those songs [of the glee club], in memory's eye I could see those staggering columns of the First World War, bending under soggy packs, on many a weary march from dripping dusk to drizzling dawn, slogging ankle-deep through the mire of shell-shocked roads, to form grimly for the attack, blue-lipped, covered with sludge and mud, chilled by the wind and rain, driving home to their objective, and for many, to the judgment seat of God.

    I do not know the dignity of their birth, but I do know the glory of their death.

    They died unquestioning, uncomplaining, with faith in their hearts, and on their lips the hope that we would go on to victory.

    Always, for them: Duty, Honor, Country; always their blood and sweat and tears, as we sought the way and the light and the truth.

    And 20 years after, on the other side of the globe, again the filth of murky foxholes, the stench of ghostly trenches, the slime of dripping dugouts; those boiling suns of relentless heat, those torrential rains of devastating storms; the loneliness and utter desolation of jungle trails; the bitterness of long separation from those they loved and cherished; the deadly pestilence of tropical disease; the horror of stricken areas of war; their resolute and determined defense, their swift and sure attack, their indomitable purpose, their complete and decisive victory -- always victory. Always through the bloody haze of their last reverberating shot, the vision of gaunt, ghastly men reverently following your password of: Duty, Honor, Country.

    The code which those words perpetuate embraces the highest moral laws and will stand the test of any ethics or philosophies ever promulgated for the uplift of mankind. Its requirements are for the things that are right, and its restraints are from the things that are wrong.

    The soldier, above all other men, is required to practice the greatest act of religious training -- sacrifice.

    In battle and in the face of danger and death, he discloses those divine attributes which his Maker gave when he created man in his own image. No physical courage and no brute instinct can take the place of the Divine help which alone can sustain him.

    However horrible the incidents of war may be, the soldier who is called upon to offer and to give his life for his country is the noblest development of mankind.

    You now face a new world -- a world of change. The thrust into outer space of the satellite, spheres, and missiles mark the beginning of another epoch in the long story of mankind. In the five or more billions of years the scientists tell us it has taken to form the earth, in the three or more billion years of development of the human race, there has never been a more abrupt or staggering evolution. We deal now not with things of this world alone, but with the illimitable

    distances and as yet unfathomed mysteries of the universe. We are reaching out for a new and boundless frontier.

    We speak in strange terms: of harnessing the cosmic energy; of making winds and tides work for us; of creating unheard synthetic materials to supplement or even replace our old standard basics; to purify sea water for our drink; of mining ocean floors for new fields of wealth and food; of disease preventatives to expand life into the hundreds of years; of controlling the weather for a more equitable distribution of heat and cold, of rain and shine; of space ships to the moon; of the primary target in war, no longer limited to the armed forces of an enemy, but instead to include his civil populations; of ultimate conflict between a united human race and the sinister forces of some other planetary galaxy; of such dreams and fantasies as to make life the most exciting of all time.

    And through all this welter of change and development, your mission remains fixed, determined, inviolable: it is to win our wars.

    Everything else in your professional career is but corollary to this vital dedication. All other public purposes, all other public projects, all other public needs, great or small, will find others for their accomplishment. But you are the ones who are trained to fight. Yours is the profession of arms, the will to win, the sure knowledge that in war there is no substitute for victory; that if you lose, the nation will be destroyed; that the very obsession of your public service must be: Duty, Honor, Country.

    Others will debate the controversial issues, national and international, which divide men's minds; but serene, calm, aloof, you stand as the Nation's war-guardian, as its lifeguard from the raging tides of international conflict, as its gladiator in the arena of battle. For a century and a half you have defended, guarded, and protected its hallowed traditions of liberty and freedom, of right and justice.

    Let civilian voices argue the merits or demerits of our processes of government; whether our strength is being sapped by deficit financing, indulged in too long, by federal paternalism grown too mighty, by power groups grown too arrogant, by politics grown too corrupt, by crime grown too rampant, by morals grown too low, by taxes grown too high, by extremists grown too violent; whether our personal liberties are as thorough and complete as they should be. These great national problems are not for your professional participation or military solution. Your guidepost stands out like a ten-fold beacon in the night: Duty, Honor, Country.

    You are the leaven which binds together the entire fabric of our national system of defense. From your ranks come the great captains who hold the nation's destiny in their hands the moment the war tocsin sounds. The Long Gray Line has never failed us. Were you to do so, a million ghosts in olive drab, in brown khaki, in blue and gray, would rise from their white crosses thundering those magic words: Duty, Honor, Country.

    This does not mean that you are war mongers.

    篇三:名人励志英语演讲稿

    名人英文励志演讲稿

    新一代大学英语四六级领军人物,英语专家、文化学者、出版人、策划人,“振宇英语”

    创始人,当当网外语图书热门作者。外语教学与研究出版社、北京航空航天大学出版社、大连理工大学出版社、海豚出版社、

    首都师范大学出版社、中国宇航出版社等国内一流出版社“振宇英语”丛书主编。外研社荣

    誉作者、当当网外语图书热门作者。曾任国家级媒体记者、翻译、电台英语节目主持人、“振宇英语”专栏撰稿人、大学英语

    系主任、大学英语专业特聘专家教授。 序言

    对于英语学习者来说,多听多看多练英语演讲是学地道英语的最佳有效途径之一,也是

    训练语音语调最有效的辅助手段。你不用担心这些演讲是否有语法问题,也不用担心用词是

    否准确,表达是否到位。因为一些名人的演讲稿通常是字斟句酌精心完成的。此外,通过演

    讲学英语还可以潜移默化地帮助自己提升对英文的驾驭能力,增强英语的语感和美感。 本书精选了19篇具有代表性的名人的英语演讲。这些名人或是国家领袖,或是关心民权

    民生的政治人物,或是创造经济财富的精英,或是用文字抒发情怀的作家记者,或是演艺界

    的娱乐名人。他们都在自己的领域里作出了杰出的贡献。他们思想深刻,见解独到,注定是

    站在时代前列的人。

    这些名人的演讲充满了智慧,富含启迪。它们或是结合自身经历立足于个人发展的谆谆

    教诲,像亚马逊ceo杰夫·贝索斯在普林斯顿大学演讲,他讲了自己创业的故事,以此鼓励

    毕业生:未来掌握在自己的手中,追寻自己的梦 想,慎重选择;或是号召民众面对困难迎难而上,像美国第32任总统富兰克林·罗斯福,

    他就任于美国经济大萧条时期,国内民生凋敝,萎靡不振,他告诉大家,我们惟一害怕的是

    害怕本身,展示了带领民众走出低谷的豪情;或者充满人文关怀,如美国著名作家威廉·福克

    纳,站在人类精神的高度,勉励作家文人心中时时充满爱、怜悯、同情和牺牲的精神;或是显

    示了追求自由平等的决心,如马钉路德·金和南非总统曼德拉,他们在演讲中都表达了誓死

    捍卫民-主和自由的决心;或是显示了对家庭的爱,并把这种爱升华为“老吾老,以及人之老;

    幼吾幼,以及人之幼”,如米歇尔·奥巴马,她在演讲中表达了对家庭的热爱,同时也为丈夫

    竞选呐喊助威----如果巴拉克·奥巴马当选总统,将会保证每个美国人都能享受卫生保健,

    确保本国的每个孩子都能得到世界一流的教育。精选出的这些演讲名篇题材涉猎广泛,风格

    迥异。无论你是被其恢宏的气势所震撼,还是被其精深的意蕴所折服,亦或是为其诙谐幽默

    而莞尔,都能感受到演讲者所传递的共同心声:一定要奋发向上,积极进取,做出个人应有

    的成绩,为时代,为国家做贡献。随书赠送的mp3演讲音频,为演讲者的原声音频。这些声音铿锵有力,或给你启迪,

    名人的演讲英语

    让你感动,或给你温暖,或激发你前行的信念。同时,也让你更有机会品味最地道的英语表

    达。此外,在每一篇文章之后,都附有提炼出的演讲中具有指引性、励志性的“经典语录”,

    方便模仿与背诵。地道实用的英语学得多了积累得多了,你就能很自然地表达出极为纯正的

    英语,既能提升你的书面语表达能力,也可以提升你的口语表达能力。准备好了吗?让我们从现在开始,去聆听那些温暖人心的声音吧!篇二:名人名校励志英

    语演讲稿

    ------------------------------------ it is such an honor and pleasure for me to be back at yale, especially on the

    occasion of the 300th anniversary. i have had so many memories of my time here, and

    as nick was speaking i thought about how i ended up at yale law school. and it tells

    a little bit about how much progress we’ve made.

    what i think most about when i think of yale is not just the politically charged

    atmosphere and not even just the superb legal education that i received. it was at

    yale that i began work that has been at the core of what i have cared about ever since.

    i began working with new haven legal services representing children. and i studied

    child development, abuse and neglect at the yale new haven hospital and the child

    study center. i was lucky enough to receive a civil rights internship with marian

    wright edelman at the children’s defense fund, where i went to work after i graduated.

    those experiences fueled in me a passion to work for the benefit of children,

    particularly the most vulnerable. now, looking back, there is no way that i could have predicted what path my life

    would have taken. i didn’t sit around the law school, saying, well, you know, i think

    i’ll graduate and then i’ll go to work at the children’s defense fund, and then

    the impeachment inquiry, and nixon retired or resigns, i’ll go to arkansas. i didn’

    t think like that. i was taking each day at a time. but, i’ve been very fortunate because i’ve always had an idea in my mind about

    what i thought was important and what gave my life meaning and purpose. a set of values

    and beliefs that have helped me navigate the shoals, the sometimes very treacherous

    sea, to illuminate my own true desires, despite that others say about what l should

    care about and believe in. a passion to succeed at what l thought was important and

    children have always provided that lone star, that guiding light. because l have that

    absolute conviction that every child, especially in this, the most blessed of nations

    that has ever existed on the face of earth, that every child deserves the opportunity

    to live up to his or her god-given potential. but you know that belief and conviction-it may make for a personal mission

    statement, but standing alone, not translated into action, it means very little to

    anyone else, particularly to those for whom you have those concerns.when i was thinking about running for the united states senate-which was such

    an enormous decision to make, one i never could have dreamed that i would have been

    making when i washere on campus-i visited a school in new york city and i met a young woman, who

    was a star athlete. and it doesn’t mean that once having made that choice you will always succeed.

    in fact, you won’t. there are setbacks and you will experience difficult

    disappointments. you will be slowed down and sometimes the breath will just be knocked

    out of you. but if you carry with you the values and beliefs that you can make a

    difference in your own life, first and foremost, and then in the lives of others.

    you can get back up, you can keep going. but it is also important, as i have found, not to take yourself too seriously,

    because after all, every one of us here today, none of us is deserving of full credit.

    i think every day of the blessings my birth gave me without any doing of my own. i

    chose neither my family nor my country, but they as much as anything i’ve ever done,

    determined my course. you have been there trying to serve because you have believed both that it was

    the right thing to do and because it gave something back to you. you have dared to

    care.well, dare to care to fight for equal justice for all, for equal pay for women,

    against hate crimes and bigotry. dare to care about public schools without qualified

    teachers or adequate resources. dare to care about protecting our environment. dare

    to care about the 10 million children in our country who lack health insurance. dare

    to care about the one and a half million children who have a parent in jail. the seven

    million people who suffer from hiv/aids. and thank you for caring enough to demand

    that our nation do more to help those that are suffering throughout this world with

    hiv/aids, to prevent this pandemic from spreading even further. and so bring your values and experiences and insights into politics. dare to help

    make, not just a difference in politics, but create a different politics. some have

    called you the generation of choice. you’ve been raised with multiple choice tests,

    multiple channels, multiple websites and multiple lifestyles. you’ve grown up

    choosing among alternatives that were either not imagined, created or available to

    people in prior generations. you’ve been invested with far more personal power to customize your life, to

    make more free choices about how to live than was ever thought possible. and i think

    as i look at all the surveys and research that is done, your choices reflect not only

    freedom, but personal responsibility. the social indicators, not the headlines, the social indicators tell a positive

    story: drug use and cheating and arrests being down, been pregnancy and suicides,

    drunk driving deaths being down.it is not the vast conspiracy you may have heard about; rather it’s a silent

    conspiracy of cynicism and indifference and alienation that we see every day, in our

    popular culture and in our prodigious consumerism.but as many have said before and as vaclav havel has said to memorably, “it cannot

    suffice just to invent new machines, new regulations and new institutions. it is

    necessary to understand differently and more perfectly the true purpose of our

    existence on this earth and of our deeds.” and i think we are called on to reject,

    in this time of blessings that we enjoy, those who will tear us apart and tear us

    down and instead to liberate our god-given spirit, by being willing to dare to dream

    of a better world. during my campaign, when times were tough and days were long i used to think about

    the example of harriet tubman, a heroic new yorker, a 19th century moses, who risked

    her life to bring hundreds of slaves to freedom. she would say to those who she gathered

    up in the south where she kept going back year after year from the safety of auburn,

    new york, that no matter what happens, they had to keep going. if they heard shouts

    behind them, they had to keep going. if they heard gunfire or dogs, they had to keep

    going to freedom. well, those aren’t the risks we face. it is more the silence and

    apathy and indifference that dogs our heels.thirty-two years ago, i spoke at my own graduation from wellesley, where i did

    call on my fellow classmates to reject the notion of limitations on our ability to

    effect change and instead to embrace the idea that the goal of education should be human liberation and the

    freedom to practice with all the skill of our being the art of making possible. thank you and god bless you all.篇三:名人英语演讲稿名人英语演讲稿 tribute to diana

    致戴安娜——查尔斯·斯宾塞 在全世界,戴安娜是同情心、责任心、风度和美丽的化身,是无私和人道的象征,是维

    护真正被践踏的权益的旗手,是一个超越国界的英国女孩,是一个带有自然的高贵气质的人,

    是一个不分阶层的人。this is the text of earl spencers tribute to his sister at her funeral. there

    is some very deep, powerful and heartfelt sentiment. would that those at whom it is

    aimed would take heed. the versions posted on several news services had minor errors.

    this is precisely as it was deliverd. i stand before you today the representative of a family in grief, in a country

    in mourning before a world in shock. we are all united not only in our desire to pay our respects to diana but rather

    in our need to do so. for such was her extraordinary appeal that the tens of millions of people taking

    part in this service all over the world via television and radio who never actually

    met her, feel that they, too, lost someone close to them in the early hours of sunday

    morning. it is a more remarkable tribute to diana than i can ever hope to offer her

    today. today is our chance to say thank you for the way you brightened our lives, even

    though god granted you but half a life. we will all feel cheated, always, that you

    were taken from us so young and yet we must learn to be grateful that you came along

    at all. only now you are gone do we truly appreciate what we are now without and we want

    you to know that life without you is very, very difficult. we have all despaired at our loss over the past week and only the strength of

    the message you gave us through your years of giving has afforded us the strength

    to move forward. there is a temptation to rush to canonize your memory. there is no need to do

    so. you stand tall enough as a human being of unique qualities not to need to be seen

    as a saint. indeed to sanctify your memory would be to miss out on the very core of

    your being, your wonderfully mischievous sense of humor with the laugh that bent you

    double, your joy for life transmitted wherever you took your smile, and the sparkle

    in those unforgettable eyes, your boundless energy which you could barely contain.but your greatest gift was your intuition, and it was a gift you used wisely.

    this is what underpinned all your wonderful attributes. and if we look to analyze

    what it was about you that had such a wide appeal, we find it in your instinctive

    feel for what was really important in all our lives. without your god-given sensitivity, we would be immersed in greater ignorance

    at the anguish of aids and hiv sufferers, the plight of the homeless, the isolation

    of lepers, the random destruction of land mines. diana explained to me once that it

    was her innermost feelings of suffering that made it possible for her to connect with

    her constituency of the rejected. the world sensed this part of her character and cherished her for her

    vulnerability, whilst admiring her for her honesty. the last time i saw diana was

    on july the first, her birthday, in london, when typically she was not taking time

    to celebrate her special day with friends but was guest of honor at a fund-raising

    charity evening. she sparkled of course, but i would rather cherish the days i spent with her in

    march when she came to visit me and my children in our home in south africa. i am

    proud of the fact that apart from when she was on public display meeting president

    mandela, we managed to contrive to stop the ever-present paparazzi from getting a

    single picture of her. that meant a lot to her. these were days i will always treasure. it was as if wed been transported back

    to our childhood, when we spent such an enormous amount of time together, the two

    youngest in the family.fundamentally she hadnt changed at all from the big sister who mothered me as

    a baby, fought with me at school and endured those long train journeys between our

    parents homes with me at weekends. it is a tribute to her level-headedness and strength

    that despite the most bizarre life imaginable after her childhood, she remained intact,

    true to herself. there is no doubt that she was looking for a new direction in her life at this

    time. she talked endlessly of getting away from england, mainly because of the treatment she

    received at the hands of the newspapers. i dont think she ever understood why her genuinely good intentions were sneered

    at by the media, why there appeared to be a permanent quest on their behalf to bring

    her down. it is baffling. my own, and only, explanation is that genuine goodness is

    threatening to those at the opposite end of the moral spectrum. it is a point to remember that of all the ironies about diana, perhaps the greatest

    was this; that a girl given the name of the ancient goddess of hunting was, in the

    end, the most hunted person of the modern age. she would want us today to pledge ourselves to protecting her beloved boys william

    and harry from a similar fate. and i do this here, diana, on your behalf. we will

    not allow them to suffer the anguish that used regularly to drive you to tearful

    despair.beyond that, on behalf of your mother and sisters, i pledge that we, your blood

    family, will do all we can to continue the imaginative and loving way in which you

    were steering these two exceptional young men, so that their souls are not simply

    immersed by duty and tradition but can sing openly as you planned. we fully respect the heritage into which they have both been born, and will always

    respect and encourage them in their royal role. but we, like you, recognize the need

    for them to experience as many different aspects of life as possible, to arm them

    spiritually and emotionally for the years ahead. i know you would have expected

    nothing less from us.

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